Quinten Plummer

About the Author Quinten Plummer


Social Networking

Traversing the Social Media Minefield

Many people expect celebrities and other prominent figures to have thicker skins than the average Jane or Joe. However — as evidenced by the numbers of celebrities who’ve forsaken social media — fame and fortune are not effective defenses against an all-out troll assault. While attacks on private individuals can be more personal and more targeted, they’re typically much less numerous.

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Internet

Conspiracy Theories in the Information Age, Part 1

One of the most volatile conspiracy theories in recent times ended with a whimper last month, when Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump made the terse statement, “President Barack Obama was born in the U.S. Period.” Though birthers may be with us always, it seems many have turned their attention to other potentially scandalous topics — and they need look no further than the Internet.

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Social Networking

Surviving the Internet’s Troll Apocalypse

Social media has sharpened humans’ age-old appetite for public shaming, providing a stage and unlimited seating for an endless stream of immorality plays. Those who share even the simplest identifying details about themselves are vulnerable to being pushed into the glare of the spotlight. Anonymity frees many individuals of the consequences they might face offline for being abusive to others.

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Social Networking

The Internet’s Shameful Role in Propagating Body Shaming

A problem once associated mainly with school playgrounds often follows people into adulthood, and the anonymity of the Internet has aided its proliferation. People have been shamed for being overweight, underweight, too conservative, too revealing, too young, too old, too plastic or too real. Bullying and harassment are very real problems not only for children, but also for countless adults.

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Social Networking

The Growing Scourge of Cyberbullying, Part 1

Smartphones are proliferating among adolescents, and so is cyberbullying. That’s particularly worrisome due to its potential contribution to the No. 2 cause of teen death: suicide. About 26.3 percent of the middle- and high-school students who responded to a nine-school survey indicated that they’d been bullied in each of the eight years the poll was taken, researchers found.

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Health

The Internet of Medical Things, Part 2: Devices and Apps

Concerns have been multiplying in the United States over the creaks of a medical infrastructure that’s bearing the weight of an aging population. Current and upcoming members of the over-65 club are helping to drive a new age in healthcare, in which devices connect patients with caregivers, things get even smarter, and machines get even better at learning what sensors are saying.

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virtual reality

Google: Dare to Daydream

Google’s Cardboard has proved to the masses that virtual reality is more than a pipe dream. Inexpensive cardboard headsets leverage smartphones to create makeshift head-mounted displays for low-level VR experiences. For those whose fancies of owning a US$600 Rift or a $900 Vive were out of reach, Cardboard was a way to keep their imaginations captive while Google was dreaming of Daydream.

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Emerging Tech

The Rise of Drone Racing, Part 2

With lucrative broadcast deals and cup competitions now crowding calendars, drone racing has become one of the primary factors driving the surge in demand for consumer drones. Mountain Dew and DR1 Racing earlier this month announced a special DR1 Invitational presented by Mountain Dew. The one-hour broadcast will air on Discovery Communication’s Discovery and Science channels in August.

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Emerging Tech

The Rise of Drone Racing, Part 1

Tearing through open spaces and timing each turn to burst out of them, a seeming continuum of drones weaves through a set of obstacles lap after lap, until the stutter of a pilot’s joystick breaks the cadence of this competitive concert and destroys the illusion. It’s the drama — anticipating and reacting to those human moments — that has propelled drone racing to the spotlight.

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Health

Aging at Home, Part 2: Some Tech to Watch Over Me

When road maps for advanced care terminate in the familiar surroundings of one’s home, as opposed to assisted living facilities and hospitals, technology can be as critical and comforting as human caregiving. Neither can replace the benefits the other brings. For individuals who would like to age in place, it’s critical to factor in new and upcoming technologies when having end-game conversations.

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Health

Aging at Home, Part 1: Home May Be Where the Technology Is

Medicare started off the year putting into action a program to encourage more doctors to discuss end-of-life and advance care plans with patients. While the details tend to focus on the hard choices on the far side of those arrangements, new and near-future technologies could preserve life’s simple pleasures on their front end. End-of-life conversations are meant to cover more than the final days or weeks.

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Social Networking

Sports Fans and Social Media, Part 2: Perils, Pitfalls and Best Practices

This fall will see a 10-game pilot of professional football streamed on social media — Twitter, to be specific. It’s a continuation of the NFL’s search for gold in the veins of digital broadcasting and an opportunity for sports brands to forge new and deeper relations with fans. For teams looking to bolster their brands, social networks have evolved into a critical channel.

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Social Networking

Sports Fans and Social Media, Part 1: It’s a Brand New Ball Game

Twitter and the NFL are betting that a partnership announced this month could help refine the roughly defined relationship between social media and the world of sports. The NFL set out to reclaim fans who chewed through their cable TV cords and strayed from the flock of football faithful. Twitter’s motive in agreeing to stream 10 gridiron games during the 2016 season was growth and retention.

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E-Commerce

Amazon Doubles Down on Dash

Amazon last week announced that it had increased to more than 100 the number of Dash buttons Prime users can install in their homes to replenish supplies of household goods. Dash buttons, which essentially are free for Amazon Prime members, are connected devices that link to a customer’s account. With the press of a button, they can order shipments of the product associated with a Dash module.

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Deals

Foxconn Finally Wrangles Sharp Deal

Foxconn has agreed to purchase a controlling stake in Sharp — about 66 percent — for roughly $3.5 billion, the companies announced Wednesday. Foxconn has committed to restoring Sharp’s profitability and improving operations, according to the companies. “I am confident that we will unlock Sharp’s true potential,” Foxconn CEO Terry Gou said. The acquisition brings months of speculation to a close.

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virtual reality

You Rang? Microsoft’s Holoportation Redefines Face-to-Face Communication

Microsoft on Monday unveiled its version of a teleporter, called “holoportation,” which was designed to transmit 3D models of people anywhere in the world. Holoportation compresses, transmits and reconstructs the 3D scans to Microsoft’s HoloLens and other head-mounted displays. It lets headset wearers interact with remote users in 3D as if they were in the same space, according to Microsoft.

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E-Commerce

Amazon Power User Excommunicated

Amazon has carved another notch in its belt, adding one more customer to what it has called a “tiny fraction of cases” of people who make too many returns. The company banned Greg Nelson, a computer programmer, from shopping at the site because he returned 37 of 343 items purchased, according to a report last week. The returned products were damaged, faulty or not as described, Nelson asserted.

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Smartphones

Apple Brings Back That 4-Inch Feeling

Apple on Monday announced a pair of new products in old sizes — the 4-inch iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro — banking on user preferences for the familiar form factors to lessen their hesitancy to upgrade. Although Apple’s hour-long “Loop You In” event was short on surprises, it was slimmer on filler as well. Among the notable extras, Apple announced a price cut bringing the Apple Watch to $300.

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